Pinteresting Changes in Consumer Culture

If blogging led to early-onset writer delusion in a portion of the population that never suffered from it before, Pinterest is the domain of the visually literate. It says kudos to all those who asked ‘How do you read such thick books with no pictures?’ Users board images into cute piles of colour, metaphorical structures (bridges, tunnels, and doors), hairstyles, nails, typography, illustrations, and package design… It is possible to pin videos as well, yet most of the pins are images.

Most Pinterest boards are visual lollipops for grown women

Although the gender and age profile differs from country to country, Pinterest is the first major social media tool where women are the majority. Earlier this year, 83% of the US users were women, with the typical age range between 35-44. In Great Britain, 56% of the users were male and their age profile was more youthful, on average 10 years younger than in the US. Since there are more users from the States, the average pinterest user is a career woman or housewife in her late thirties. There are also quite a few creative types active on Pinterest, but the majority of users look like the desperate housewives turned quaint. This stereotypical profile has a great influence on the popular user from other countries, as following boards and repinning images is the basic mode of user interaction on Pinterest. Given the age-gender profile, it is surprising to see a lot more logo, typography, and package design collectors than you’d expect. There are also umpteen pinners of designer garments and objects, indicating the successful dissemination of design culture among the masses. However, the stereotypical Pinterester is not likely to be able to afford most of what she pins in a million years.

domestic but quaint, mrs. french of Portland, Oregon is very popular

Pinterest is quickly changing early twenty-first century consumer culture and social media. Pinterest is taking design consciousness from the in crowd and feeding it to the masses. One possible impact is investment by FMCG producers in package design, slowly moving towards quaint packaging. Retro and quaint packaging, associated with organic and artisanal food, incites consumer trust about the quality of the product. With the popular pinterest in package design, we may see more blue chip FMCG clad in cute packages, even if only for specific marketing campaigns. Coca Cola’s limited edition ‘125 years box set’ from last year can be seen as a precursor for blue chip catering to mass vintage hysteria.

Brands like Bonne Maman can boast of cool packaging, as well as claiming ‘artisanal’ quality. Despite the fact that, it is ‘the largest exporter of jam in the world. It’s image, reputation and worldwide distribution make Bonne Maman one of the most famous brands that represent France abroad.’

Pinterest also changed online identity construction. In a pinteresting twist of lack and desire, all you have to do now is to showcase your taste! You can construct your identity, not on the basis of what you own, but on the basis of what you want to own. Now consumers are window-shopping and window-displaying products they may or may not be able to afford. It’s been a quick ride from the surge of ‘look what I’m wearing today’ blogs to pinning ‘what I’d be wearing, if only I could afford it’ on Pinterest. What used to be exclusive content in Monocle is being repinned every second. This new development in lifestyle has important implications for the future of social media. Social media boomed with sharing real-life experiences: WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Four Square, and Flickr owe their success to the willingness of private individuals in sharing their activities, work, and content. With Pinterest, you don’t have to go to Thailand to display photos of Phuket. Neither do you not have to cite the photographer or the source. While it is possible to track the original sources of most content, one can pin images one hoarded on one’s harddisk onto her or his boards and infringe copyright.

Virtual pilgrimages

Pinterest is converting social media users into curators of consumerism, who consciously construct their online identity by showcasing their taste in content selection and display. What we own used to be central to who we are, we desired what we lacked. On Pinterest we show all that we lack and desire without the necessity of doing anything about it. The world of 21st century online curation is changing the meaning of desire. Come on, pin that, you will be the most pinteresting virtual it-girl of the year!

My un-pinteresting asaroton curation with too much text!!!

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